Downtown Transformation Enters Next Phase Construction Will Close Streets and Reroute Traffic
EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY  CONTACT
August 02, 2013 Jeri Rowe-Curtis
425-556-2427

Redmond, WA
  —In the next few weeks, Cleveland Street in downtown Redmond will enter its next phase of construction work which may result in disruptions to traffic and pedestrians as they are re-routed through the Downtown core. Work will commence over the next two weeks to two months, beginning with sewer line improvements to Cleveland Street, followed by actual demolition of the buildings that remain (as part of the Master Plan for the Downtown Park site). Removal of the four Elm trees located in front of the historic Stone House (located at 16244 Cleveland Street) will also get underway during the next two weeks.

“After all of our efforts these projects are aligning in a way that will still inconvenience folks,” states Lisa Singer, City project manager. During the sewer improvement work and building demolition, the street will close or be narrowed to traffic during peak and non-peak hours from 7:00 am to 3:30pm. Traffic along 161st Ave. NE and Leary Way will be impacted. The actual demolition of the buildings which had housed Redmond Cycle, Quiznos/Vet, and Brown St Square will commence and will last about two months. This critical demolition work makes way for the rest of the Downtown Park Master Plan.

During construction, Brown St. (between Cleveland St and Redmond Way) will be permanently closed to traffic and parking to accommodate construction staging and routing. “The east half of the Downtown Park will be fenced off during this time for use as a key staging area during the Cleveland Streetscape construction. This allows for fewer impacts to the public by having materials and equipment staged adjacent to the project,” states Singer. Once the Cleveland Streetscape construction is completed, Brown St. paving will be removed to make that area part of the Downtown Park.

“In spite of long and hard efforts to save the four elm trees, including extensive trimming this past spring, the trees are too damaged and diseased to remain. They pose too great a risk and need to come down; this is a particularly hard decision.” states Teresa Kluver, arborist for the City of Redmond. She adds, “Although Redmond will be losing four of its wonderful old elms, they will live on in a new role as part of the City’s goal to recycle natural resources.” The elm logs will be placed along Bear Creek, which is also undergoing restoration and changes to support a critical natural Salmon habitat. The logs will help create habitat for wildlife. Landscape planters will temporarily fill the void left by the elm trees until the Cleveland Streetscape project is completed.

As Cleveland Street emerges out of construction, new lush clusters of trees and shrubs will be planted during the later stages of this project. Cleveland Street will not only become the promenade as the part of the City’s vision for Downtown, it will also serve as a corridor from the Redmond Central Connector to the Downtown Park. When completed, its unique design features will allow for sections of the road to be closed to through traffic to accommodate cultural and arts events.

To learn more about the Downtown construction or various projects, visit www.redmond.gov/downtown





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