Dudley Carter Park

Dudley Carter Park is just over one acre of green space with picnic tables along the Sammamish River Trail, at the junction of Leary Way.

The park’s namesake, Dudley Carter, was an internationally renowned local artist specializing in wood carving, a craft that he learned from the Kwakuitl people along the coast of British Columbia, where Mr. Carter resided until his early adulthood. Mr. Carter carved many totems, sculptures, and Haida House replicas that exist in the area, including:

  • Three Panel Abstraction at Luke McRedmond Landing;
  • Fantail Bird the Redmond Senior Center;
  • High Mountain Companions the western field at Redmond Town Center;
  • Wek Wek and the Holukmeyumko and Two Thunderbirds grace the Pet Memorial Garden at Marymoor;
  • Legend of the Moon, at the Marymoor Park entrance.
  • Carvings at the Redmond Library include Rivalry of the Winds, Bird Woman, Desert Scout, Birds, and Waterfall and Fawn and Bird

The park includes Dudley Carter’s Haida House Replica No. 4, a piece of artwork that Mr. Carter carved in the 1980s and reconstructed on site in the early 1990s while he was artist in residence at the park. The Haida House is a roughly 600 square foot, single-room wooden structure that includes ornate carved figures on the roof eaves and an iconic totem pole entry. The Haida House Replica No. 4 is designated as a King County landmark.

The City recently completed a master plan for the park that includes improvements to Haida House Replica No. 4, landscaping, signage, gathering places, art, and a possible multi-purpose building for artists to provide classes and for picnicking.

Directions
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Corner of Leary Way and 159th Place NE

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Natural Areas
Open Space 

 

Photos
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Slough Park